Other People’s Patterns

Mostly I’ve focused my blogging efforts on the things I’ve been designing myself, but I still use ‘real’ patterns. Deer and Doe is my favorite pattern house, followed by Papercut Patterns. They both produce flattering patterns and their drafting is usually great. I don’t have to make too many adjustments, either, just a broad shoulder adjustment if the pattern is for woven fabrics.

I’ve made 3 garments from Deer & Doe patterns this Spring. Here they are! (I bought a couple of the new Papercut Patterns line, can’t wait to start on them!)

First up the D&D Bleuet in a heavy-ish linen. I made the puff sleeves but ultimately removed them. My shoulders are big enough without accentuating them with poofs!

 

Sticking with dresses, this one’s an Arum dress. No changes to the pattern were made here. I used a Liberty Tana Lawn that I got on sale. It’s very soft, crisp, and light but creases easily.arum dress

Last up is the Goji Skirt. I didn’t think I was going to buy this pattern initially but I realized it would be perfect for filling the “casual skirt gap” in my wardrobe. I chose this light, South-West inspired blue and white cotton. Despite worrying excessively (or perhaps because of worrying excessively), I got the horizontal stripes to match up on all the seams (I didn’t try to match the repeat within those stripes). And I cut the pockets on the bias.

This is a fun pattern. I really like the paper-bag waistband. I want to make another using a border print in my stash.

 

Necktie

In which we feel the power!

Vms necktie
yes, I fiddled with the tie all day. It’s a weird feeling to be wearing one! 

I drafted a necktie! There wasn’t much to it besides figuring out the right sizing for me. I used one of my hubby’s neckties as a guide. I measured both parts of the tie and his neck size. From there I was able to calculate how much extra length was needed beyond the neck size using percentages.

I just winged the construction, so I didn’t sew it together properly. I stitched the tip linings on first, turned them, then sewed the center back seam like I would a belt loop, turned the whole thing, then pressed.

Apparently, you’re supposed to slip-stitch the tie closed and sew the lining on in a certain way, so I will be doing that next time for a more professional finish.

Google did help me learn to tie this thing. I used a four-in-hand knot. It was easy!

I see many more ties in my future, each one a Power Tie.

 

Some tunic to love

In which I draft a tunic…

It’s been a long time since I loved a tunic. The last one I remember having was sky blue with 3/4 length sleeves held up by epaulets,  with pin-tucks and simple white embroidery on the front yoke. It had little straps to cinch the waist and a mandarin collar. I think it bought it at Burlington’s.

While that tunic is long gone, I still miss it. I tried other tunics but they weren’t the same. Too many of them have empire waists or weird, unnecessary details that turn me off.

So now that I have a custom sloper and a fitted shirt pattern, I decided to tackle making a tunic I can love again.

There were a few crucial elements this tunic needed to have:

  1. It must be blue.
  2. It must have 3/4 length sleeves with cuffs and an epaulet.
  3. It must cinch at the waist.

Thankfully I had already found my fabric – a light blue cotton with Jackson Pollock-esque white and silver splatter. It was begging me to become a tunic!

I made some sketches to get an idea of what I wanted and set to work.

The very first thing (every time) is making a copy! For this project, I intended to use my fitted shirt pattern as the base for the tunic pattern. I also gathered my DD Airelle and DD Arum patterns for reference, as they are pull-over tops. I measured the width of these 2 patterns to make sure my tunic could be pulled over my head, too.

Math is a beautiful thing. Minus the placket allowance and waist dart, the fitted shirt pattern was just the right size to fit over my head! Minimal adjustments necessary!

I decided to keep the bust darts for shaping but completely eliminated the front and back waist darts. I also removed the 1.5″ button placket allowance from the front.

Next was the neckline. I wanted clean-finished v-neckline (without a center front seam on the bodice). After some measuring, I marked a point on the shoulder seam and another on the center front line, connecting them with a ruler. I adjusted the back neckline on the shoulder seams to match. Using this new neckline, I traced facing pieces for the front and back, making them 1.5″ wide.

I attached the facings and understitched, meticulously clipping and layering the front “v” so it would turn out sharp and crisp. Then I hand tacked the facing to the shoulder seams to hold it in place.

For the sleeves, I used the same ones I drafted for the fitted shirt. I traced a facing for the sleeve cuff, hemmed one edge, and attached it so the cuff could be folded to the outside with its right side facing out.

I stitched the epaulet on by hand for the inside and attached it to the outside with a  9mm button. To finish, I slip stitched the cuff to the sleeve in a few strategic places.

That’s it….I love this new tunic. It turned out just as I wanted and I have already made a second one with a deeper neckline and short sleeves.

Personal Style for the Anti-Trendy

In which we face a conundrum…

Personal style is a tricky thing, especially when you draw from non-fashion sources. Nearly every post I’ve read about determining one’s personal style recommends deferring to your favorite fashion icon. But what if your fashion icons are all fictional or fantasy characters?

Dear friends, that is my problem. Here’s a little inspo block:

And my inspo page for fall/ winter 2016:

See? Nary a real person. So how am I to translate the characters’ fantasy style into everyday garments?

I should note that you can apply your inspirations to fashion from just about anywhere – architecture, art, science, etc. (check out blueprints for sewing’s architecture-inspired patterns, for example).

Things like color and silhouette can easily be adopted into a wardrobe. For me it’s about subtlety. To the average person, I want my fictional references to go unnoticed.

The main point is how the garment makes me feel. And wearing certain clothes can make you feel differently. They embolden and empower, or make you feel lovely and calm. I like to use my wardrobe as a versatile set of status buffs (for non-gamers, “buffs” are akin to spells or potions that affect the user positively).

The theory is: If I feel confident, I will act confidently. If I feel powerful, I will act powerfully.

Take the fall winter inspo page- my choices were based on what “buffs” I anticipate needing in the near future. This year has been one of standing up for myself, so my inspo page was based on female strength and power.

One of my two chosen characters is Khaleesi. I love her outfits and her attitude. But I cant walk around in a loincloth dress like her, now can I? So instead, I’m making a long blue cardigan and kid gloves. Earlier this year, I made a test version (totally wearable, yay!) of the Safran pants in a very Khaleesi-esque fabric, reminiscent of her leggings. I can’t wait to wear the whole outfit.

{ Side note: My other character choice is Lao Ma, from the show Xena. I chose her for her famous philosophy (which the show borrowed from a real life philosopher, Tao Te Ching), “to conquer others is to have power, to conquer yourself is to know the way”. She’s got this ultra-serene presence but she’s a deadly fighter.}

You can also use color and color combinations to pay homage to a certain character. I have a green dress with a pink bow (DD Bleuet) ala Sailor Jupiter.

Pink & Green Thunder

My second pair of Safran pants are brown with blue top stitching – a color scheme I stole from Ash of the Evil Dead movies. (Side note: I wore those pants with a button up shirt to Thanksgiving and my husband said I looked like Westworld’s Delores – bonus!!)

Ash and Delores

Essentially, the key is to find the usable elements from your inspo, whatever they may be, and incorporate them as best you can, even if you’re the only person who recognizes your references. I feel like it adds a little secret touch to my clothes that make me feel true to myself and gives an extra boost.